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Tuesday, April 06, 2010

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Mr. McGregor's Daughter

You'd better get to The Flower Factory before me, or there won't be any left! I love Hepatica and silvery variegation sounds great. What does it look like in fall? Does it turn ruby like the species acutiloba/nobilis var. acuta?

Altoon

What a lovely little plant, which I've never heard of before; it's not even listed in my "Perennials for American Gardens". It looks like a small version of an anemone, Snowdrop, anemone sylvestris, which is horribly invasive in my garden; I read on Wikipedia that it's sometimes grouped with anemones.

LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD

MMD — No significant fall color change. In the third and fourth photos you can see fall foliage after being buried under snow. I would say it turns green and brown rather than the green and silver of summer.

Altoon — I first planted Snowdrop anemone in 2004 and have added more since then, but it is very slow to grow or spread in my garden. Still, I may be in for a surprise one of these days.

I think Hepaticas should grow for you and the foliage is lovely all year long. It is probably not listed in "Perennials" because it is a spring ephemeral, but the leaves last in my garden.

Lisa at Greenbow

That photo showing the fuzzy stems makes one want to pet it. They are so tiny yet beautiful.

Julie Siegel

I would guess that Altoon's Anemone sylvestris have more sun than Linda's.

Glorious photos and yes, this plant is new to me too.

MNGarden

You have sold me. I want some. :)

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