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Wednesday, July 22, 2009

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hydrophyte

Ooh I like that crane with Gallium. I am a fellow Madisonian and pleased to have encountered this site. You have great photography--puts my messy blog to shame. I am going to look around some more.

Barbara H.

The crane is fantastic in its setting. It really plays against the green ground cover. Have fun resting - your garden is wonderful but as everything in nature changes, so will the art in your garden.

Lisa at Greeenbow

Unless you want to sleep in your garden you wouldn't want too much sameness. I don't think the crane is any more cliche than Japanese style lanterns or stone gods in a garden. I think the crane is more natural in a garden especially where you live. The Sandhill cranes nest there. Your garden has a very soothing feel.

LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD

Welcome hydrophyte. And your blog is not messy but quite fascinating.

Barbara and Lisa — thanks for the comments. I really like the idea of sleeping in the garden; especially now that our neighbors have caught 3 raccoons in the last week. That will make it quieter and safer. Now just need a big enough net to keep the mosquitoes off of us!

Pam/Digging (Austin)

I think a crane *is* a cliche, as are stone lanterns, as Lisa points out, but they appeal to us because they are cultural references. I absolutely LOVE your crane, especially as showcased against that chartreuse groundcover. It's stunning. Don't get rid of it.

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